EAST is built on four principles.

Provided with an array of cuttingedge technologies, students in EAST choose which technologies they’d like to use and work together to apply those in solving community problems.

Since 1996, the EAST experience has proven to empower students by preparing them not only for academic success, but professional accomplishments as well.

EAST:

  • Attracts students who might not otherwise gain critical science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) skills.8
  • Provides lifelong skills applicable to other learning and working environments.2
  • Provides a tremendous boon to economic development through projects.1,5

The EAST experience has been recognized nationally as an innovative, relevant approach to education and been recognized as a model program by the U.S. Departments of Education and labor.6, 7

EAST has also been proven to have a positive effect on a variety of learning domains, particularly problem solving, and has been shown to translate into high test scores across a variety of subjects.3, 4

To find a school with EAST near you, please click here.
If you would like to know more about how to get EAST at your school, click here.
  1. Andrews, C. Wilkins, L. Environmental and Spatial Technology (EAST) Project – an Industry/Education Collaboration that Works for Females and Minorities. Paper presented at the National Association of Minority Engineering Program Administers/Women in Engineering Program & Advocates Network, April 2124, 2001, Alexandria, VA. Environmental and Spatial Technology (EAST) Project – an Industry/Education Collaboration that Works for Females and Minorities (PDF)
  2. University of Central Arkansas Center for Community & Economic Development, 2011 study estimating the economic impact of the EAST Initiative in Arkansas. Estimating the Economic Impact of EAST Projects in Arkansas (PDF)
  3. Metis Associates, EAST Initiative in Arkansas, follow-up study to the 2003-2006 evaluation of Arkansas Environmental and Spatial Technology Initiative (EAST). Metis 2003-2006 follow up study of EAST (PDF)
  4. Metis Associates, Final Report. 2003-2006 evaluation of Arkansas Environmental and Spatial Technology Initiative (EAST). Metis Executive Summary of EAST (PDF) Metis Final Report on EAST (PDF) Metis Appendices Final Report on EAST (PDF)
  5. Maui Economic Development Board, Women in Technology Project, 2006. Sustained Gender Equity High School Programs Enrich Pipeline of Female Future Engineers. Maui Economic Development Board Article (PDF)
  6. Thornburg, David D. (2005), Why EAST Matters: EAST – Preparing Students for the Future. The Thornburg Center. Why EAST Matters (PDF)
  7. U.S. Department of Education, Office of Educational Technology. Toward A New Golden Age in American Education: How the Internet, the Law and Today’s Students Are Revolutionizing Expectations, Washington, D.C., 2004. Department of Education Article (PDF)
  8. Bynum, Judith. Student Perceptions of Concomitant Learnings of EAST Lab in a Small, Rural Arkansas School District – An executive summary of dissertation submitted to University of Arkansas at Little Rock Department of Educational Leadership of the College of Education. Student Learnings Executive Summary (PDF)
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