Research

The EAST model is grounded in solid pedagogical theory related to the use of technology as a catalyst for learning, collaborative learning, and performance-based learning. In the EAST model:

  • The use of technology promotes collaboration, higher order thinking, and problem solving.
  • Professional development is an important component of the education technology program.
  • Technology is effectively integrated into the curriculum.
  • Students independently select appropriate technology tools to obtain, analyze, synthesize and assimilate information.
  • Home/school connections are enhanced through the use of technology.
  • All students have adequate access to technology.
  • Teachers encourage students to utilize technology to find and make sense of information.

Resources supporting the EAST model:

Andrews, C. Wilkins, L. Environmental and Spatial Technology (EAST) Project – an Industry/Education Collaboration that Works for Females and Minorities. Paper presented at the National Association of Minority Engineering Program Administers/Women in Engineering Program & Advocates Network, April 21-24, 2001, Alexandria, VA. Environmental and Spatial Technology (EAST) Project – an Industry/Education Collaboration that Works for Females and Minorities (PDF)

University of Central Arkansas Center for Community & Economic Development, 2011 study estimating the economic impact of the EAST Initiative in Arkansas. Estimating the Economic Impact of EAST Projects in Arkansas (PDF)

Metis Associates, EAST Initiative in Arkansas, follow-up study to the 2003-2006 evaluation of Arkansas Environmental and Spatial Technology Initiative (EAST). Metis 2003-2006 follow up study of EAST (PDF)

Metis Associates, Final Report. 2003-2006 evaluation of Arkansas Environmental and Spatial Technology Initiative (EAST). Metis Executive Summary of EAST (PDF) Metis Final Report on EAST (PDF) Metis Appendices Final Report on EAST (PDF)

Maui Economic Development Board, Women in Technology Project, 2006. Sustained Gender Equity High School Programs Enrich Pipeline of Female Future Engineers. Maui Economic Development Board Article (PDF)

Thornburg, David D. (2005), Why EAST Matters: EAST – Preparing Students for the Future. The Thornburg Center. Why EAST Matters (PDF)

U.S. Department of Education, Office of Educational Technology. Toward A New Golden Age in American Education: How the Internet, the Law and Today’s Students Are Revolutionizing Expectations, Washington, D.C., 2004. Department of Education Article (PDF)

Bynum, Judith. Student Perceptions of Concomitant Learnings of EAST Lab in a Small, Rural Arkansas School District – An executive summary of dissertation submitted to University of Arkansas at Little Rock Department of Educational Leadership of the College of Education. Student Learnings Executive Summary (PDF)

Andrews, C. Wilkins, L. Environmental and Spatial Technology (EAST) Project – an Industry/Education Collaboration that Works for Females and Minorities. Paper presented at the National Association of Minority Engineering Program Administers/Women in Engineering Program & Advocates Network, April 21-24, 2001, Alexandria, VA.

Cohen, David (1993). Teaching for Understanding: Challenges for Policy and Practice. San Francisco, CA. Jossey-Bass, Inc.

Enhancing Education Through Technology. No Child Left Behind (Title II Part D). http://www.ed.gov/legislation/ESEA02/pg34.html (19 Aug. 2002).

National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), (2002). Technology in Schools: suggestions, tools, and guidelines for assessing technology in elementary and secondary education. U.S. Department of Education, Office of Educational Research and Improvement (NCES 2003-313).

NCREL-Published Research (NCREL), (2000). Computer-Based Technology and Learning: Evolving Uses and Expectations, Valdez, Gilbert, McNabb, Mary, Foertsch, Mary, Anderson, Mary, Hawkes, Mark, and Raack, Lenaya, 2000.

Partnership for 21st Century Skills, (2003). AOL-Time Warner; Apple; Cable in the Classroom; Cisco; Dell; the National Education Association (NEA); Microsoft; SAP and the U.S. Department of Education. http://p21.org/

Riel, M. (1990). Computer-mediated Communication: A Tool for Reconnecting Kids with Society. Interactive Learning Environments, 1(40).

Riel, M. (1989). The Impact of Computers in Classrooms. Journal of Research on Computing in Education.

Sandholtz, J.H., Ringstaff, C., Dwyer, D.C. Teaching with Technology: Creating Student-Centered Classrooms (1997). NY: Teachers College Press.

Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (1991). What Work Requires of Schools. A SCANS Report for America 2000. Washington, DC.: U.S. Department of Labor.

Ringstaff, C., & Kelley, L. (2002). The Learning Return on Our Educational Technology Investment. A review of findings from research. San Francisco, CA: WestED.

Technology briefs for No Child Left Behind Planners (2002). Northeast and the Islands Regional Technology in Education Consortium (NEIR*TEC). http://www.neirtec.org/products/techbriefs/default.asp

Topping, K. J., Bircham, A., & Shaw, M. (1997). Family Electronic Literacy: Home-school Links Through Audiotaped Book. Reading, 31(2).

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