Eureka Springs High School Receives Arkansas Game and Fish Commission Grant

   

8/12/2013 3:12:05 PM

Pat Knighten of the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission (extreme left) visited the Eureka Springs High School to drop off a $3,454.00 check as part of the AGFC Wildlife School Grant that the EAST Lab applied for and received. Ms. Knighten spent the morning at the EAST Lab visiting with EAST students and the newly planted butterfly garden.

Pat Knighten of the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission (extreme left) visited the Eureka Springs High School to drop off a $3,454.00 check as part of the AGFC Wildlife School Grant that the EAST Lab applied for and received. Ms. Knighten spent the morning at the EAST Lab visiting with EAST students and the newly planted butterfly garden. The garden was designed to attract various native butterflies and beautify the high school. Meeting with Ms. Knighten were EAST facilitator Mila Powell, High School principal David Childers, Bear Creek Nursery owner Gordon Powell and EAST Lab students Seth McCormick and Nathan Drebenstedt.

The butterfly garden was made possible through a Wild School Site Grant from the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission and with donations from local citizens (MJ Sell, Jay Galyen of Hart's Family Center, Subway Sandwich of Eureka Springs). The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission through its education program Project WILD offers grants to Arkansas schools to encourage outdoor wildlife and environment education. The Eureka Springs High School was one of 20 Arkansas schools that received a Project WILD grant.

"I am very impressed with the Eureka Springs High School's butterfly garden. It is beautiful and well done. I am thrilled that Eureka Springs students will have a chance to enjoy and learn about the butterflies that this garden will attract," said Ms. Knighten.

EAST is a unique high school class that emphasizes using advanced technology applications to solve community service projects. In the process of solving community problems, EAST students learn to become creative, intuitive, adaptable learners who can solve unpredictable, real-world problems.

The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission's Schoolyard Wildlife Habitat (SWH) program provides schools with opportunities to design areas on their campus to attract wildlife by providing crucial elements that wildlife need in order to survive. Students, administrators, parents, educators, community volunteers, and conservation professional work together to build these habitats providing students with valuable experiences ranging from the importance of teamwork to learning more about our natural world. A Schoolyard Wildlife Habitat provides educators with the means to take information beyond the classroom by using an outdoor learning laboratory alive with learning opportunities. The SWH program is funded mainly through a conservation sales tax passed by the citizens of Arkansas in 1997.

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